Go Back   WorldwideDX Amateur Radio Forums > Citizens Band Related > Installation & Station Setup


Amateur Callsign Lookup
Enter Callsign:

Tower Ground Rod Spacing

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 12-19-2007, 02:51 PM
Drifter's Avatar
Senior Member
iTrader: (0)
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Under a coconut tree in the Carribbean sipping on white rum and coke!!!
Posts: 382
Drifter is on a distinguished road
Default Tower Ground Rod Spacing


Ok what is the spacing between ground rods used to ground antenna on tower. I will be running solid copper ground wire from a gang box holding my Polyphaser lightning arrestors. I have three 8' ground rods going to make a triange shape, tieing all three ground rods together with the ground wire. Just need to know the correct spacing between ground rods. I was thinking 6' apart.

Merry Christmas all.
__________________

Yaesu 101E
Signal Engineering lightning 6 quad Antenna on a 60FT crank up tower.


Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 12-19-2007, 02:54 PM
Senior Member
iTrader: (0)
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: 187 out of Wisconsin
Posts: 779
lords is on a distinguished road
Default

well my pal did his up like a quad and had them 1 foot from the tower bottom and sunk in the ground..
__________________

Cobra-90LTD 8 swinging 35 Noclip
Cobra 148GTL
Cobra 148F(EXPORT)
Cobra 200GTL
Mod V-Plus
Homemade 8 pill running 18 volts
Brute force 350
Maco V5000
Spitfire 427 3 element beam

Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 12-19-2007, 03:28 PM
Cat Driver's Avatar
Senior Member
iTrader: (0)
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Lake of The Ozarks
Posts: 326
Cat Driver is on a distinguished road
Default Re: Tower Ground Rod Spacing

Quote:
Originally Posted by Drifter
Ok what is the spacing between ground rods used to ground antenna on tower. I will be running solid copper ground wire from a gang box holding my Polyphaser lightning arrestors. I have three 8' ground rods going to make a triange shape, tieing all three ground rods together with the ground wire. Just need to know the correct spacing between ground rods. I was thinking 6' apart.

Merry Christmas all.
Heres some pretty good info for a lot of grounding stuff for radios

http://www.iceradioproducts.com/10.html



Ron
__________________
Ronnie-The Toolman
CB Handle--Six Pack
Lake of The Ozarks

Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 12-19-2007, 04:21 PM
Drifter's Avatar
Senior Member
iTrader: (0)
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Under a coconut tree in the Carribbean sipping on white rum and coke!!!
Posts: 382
Drifter is on a distinguished road
Default Re: Tower Ground Rod Spacing

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cat Driver
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drifter
Ok what is the spacing between ground rods used to ground antenna on tower. I will be running solid copper ground wire from a gang box holding my Polyphaser lightning arrestors. I have three 8' ground rods going to make a triange shape, tieing all three ground rods together with the ground wire. Just need to know the correct spacing between ground rods. I was thinking 6' apart.

Merry Christmas all.
Heres some pretty good info for a lot of grounding stuff for radios

http://www.iceradioproducts.com/10.html



Ron
This is what I am going to do!!!

TECHNICAL PUBLICATION #36
Grounding Coaxial Cable Shields: Why, Where, and How
Even today it's a controversial subject - but we don't know why. The purpose and importance of grounding coaxial line shields is so critical to safe and clean telecommunication station operation that it should not be a matter of discussion, except as a how-to subject such as this paper represents.

Coaxial cable used in radio and television work is referred to as unbalanced line primarily because the center conductor carries the current and signal voltage nearly all to itself. The shield of the transmission line is just that - a shield. It carries no current except for a small induced current flowing as the result of induction by length. In a perfectly matched system the current in the shield is almost nil. That's also why in most modern applications coaxial cable shields are fitted to connectors without soldering - only compression fitting. Center conductors carry the current during transmission so they are generally soldered in place.

But that doesn't mean that the shield has no work to do, and that's the purpose of this brief technical narrative. Coaxial shields provide a protection for the center conductor and prevent ground level line leakage during transmission, noise pickup from external local sources during reception, continuous impedance matching, and physical rigidity to the line.

Short distance grounding of coaxial shields introduces an earthen neutral integrity to the shield and provides a drain source for the very types of disturbances the shield is designed to resist. It's very common to hear of stories relating how interference to other services disappeared or reception noise was reduced when shield grounding was accomplished. In lightning protection applications the shield is an exposed element, and when lightning strikes overhead or a direct "hit" occurs to antennas and tower frames it's not unusual to find as much as 80% of the applied current seeking ground through the transmission line flows down the shield. If the lightning currents do not find earth through a dissipation point before reaching the radio equipment chassis then damage to the station gear will nearly always result. In severe cases injury or loss of structure can occur.

Grounding of shields is easy and requires little experience or effort. The connections for grounding should always be done at ground level if maximum value is to be obtained, and the lead length from shield to earth entry point (the dirt) should be kept as short as possible - less than a foot if possible. Using a commercial grounding block is a very neat way of accomplishing the task, but making your own shield connections can, be done as well. Cutting the cable, inserting connectors and grounding the shield by attachment to the connectors is a common method but suffers from the inevitable impedance "bump" in the line at that point and the possibility of exposure to water or contaminants. Removing the outer plastic with a sharp knife carefully, wrapping a solid copper wire around the exposed shield and then grounding the wire is another method that seems to work well and doesn't leave an impedance irregularity in the line.
However the work is done is far less important than making sure it gets done, and establishing a common point for multiple shield grounding makes sense in stations that use many different transmission lines. But the most important element is to be sure that the coaxial cable lines are ALWAYS brought to the ground surface first, and that shield grounding, is accomplished at that point BEFORE the cable continues on its way to reach station equipment. Keep the connections clean, tight, and waterproof - then relax and enjoy the benefits of your efforts!

TAKEN FROM ICE LTD Website!!
__________________

Yaesu 101E
Signal Engineering lightning 6 quad Antenna on a 60FT crank up tower.

Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 12-19-2007, 04:30 PM
Crotchety Old Bastard
iTrader: (0)
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 6,808
W5LZ is on a distinguished road
Default

Drifter,
There's no standard "rule" for the distance between ground rods. Depends on how big the ground rods are and the conductivity of the soil they are placed in. A very 'general' rule of thumb is to make each side of that 'triangle' at least one ground rod long. More distance than that is 'good' till you get to some ridiculous length (or you get tired of the whole @#$ thing and quit). Burying the conductors connecting the ground rods to the tower turns those 'conductors' into radials, which is also good, presents more 'contact' area with dirt. How deep? Deep enough so that you don't yank it all up when you run over it with the lawn mower. Is deeper better than shallower? Not really, where's the most moisture, shallow or deep? Which goes back to what kind of soil do you have.
Basically, get the rods as far apart as practical... stay out of your neighbor's yard.
- 'Doc

Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 12-19-2007, 05:54 PM
Captain Kilowatt's Avatar
Professional Amateur
iTrader: (1)
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Nova Scotia,Canada
Posts: 10,567
Captain Kilowatt is on a distinguished road
Default

Pretty much everything I have seen lately suggests that the ground rods be spaced at least twice their length. This allows the energy to be carried to ground by each rod from interfering with another rods ability to do the same thing by over saturating the ground with current.

Usefull grounding info

Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 01-18-2008, 09:06 PM
555 555 is offline
Senior Member
iTrader: (0)
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 433
555 is on a distinguished road
Default



Ground and More Ground

Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks
Worldwide Radio Forum



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 05:06 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Worldwide Radio Forum