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TCXO Filter

Discussion in 'Ham Equipment' started by Se7en, Apr 11, 2012.

  1. Se7en

    Se7en Well-Known Member

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    #1
  2. Mudfoot

    Mudfoot Supporting Member

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    In simple terms:

    It keeps your transmit/receive frequency more stable and less drifty. With the 480, you really don't need it for SSB use. It would be nice to have. If you are gonna run digital modes then it is very nice to have.

    The 500Hz filter is for CW. That's a good price on the TXCO.

    If you're gonna buy or own the 480 and have the cash... Go ahead and fill all the available slots. The high stability oscillator makes a big difference in rigs like the 706 and such, especially when moving up in frequency.
     
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    Last edited: Apr 11, 2012
  3. Robb

    Robb Yup

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    "High stability temperature compensated crystal oscillator" is a replacement, high quality reference oscillator. This makes the radio it is specifically designed for to have far less drift. Thermally controlling the crystal keeps its frequency within a tighter tolerance than any radio that doesn't have one installed.
     
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  4. Mudfoot

    Mudfoot Supporting Member

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    You have to solder all of those options in your rig. The TXCO needs an alignment after installing it, but is not to difficult. I think it comes with a little tool for the task. That 1.8 kHz SSB filter would be nice also.
     
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  5. Robb

    Robb Yup

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    Dunno about choosing a 1.8kc SSB filter though. That is a bit narrow. They don't make them for the Kenwood TS480; think the DSP controls the width - if I recall correctly. My Kenwood TS-2000 can go 3.3 wide if I mess with the DSP filter controls. It can be adjusted to be narrow too . . .
     
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  6. Mudfoot

    Mudfoot Supporting Member

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    The 480 has two IF slots. The 1.8 is a factory option. There may be an aftermarket option.

    Getting narrow and tight does have advantages at times.

    Kenwood CW choices are 500Hz and 270Hz.
     
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  7. Mudfoot

    Mudfoot Supporting Member

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    I have used a friends 480 during field days and a few contests. I noticed when the band is very crowded the 480 needed the narrow SSB filter especially since it's AF.

    I really liked the rig on CW. The narrow filter, tweaking the IF shift and finishing it off with DSP made for some nice work.
    He also runs the remote software and does some digital work at home, but I ain't into that so can't comment. I've seen more old school dudes gravitate torwards it since it is pretty easy to operate. I wish it had IF DSP, but hey, it's a nice rig with decent features (even if you have to fidget with it some) and is not expensive.
     
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    Last edited: Apr 11, 2012
  8. Captain Kilowatt

    Captain Kilowatt Professional Amateur Staff Member

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    You are right about the 1.8 KHz being a good option. It really helps when there is a lot of QRM nearby as well as when the signal is weak and near the noise floor.Fidelity is not the best but hey, it's two way voice comms not broadcasting as some people (unfortunately more and more it seems) would like to think.
     
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  9. W5LZ

    W5LZ Crotchety Old Bastard

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    To this point I haven't needed a narrower filter for the TS-480. From past experience, I wouldn't buy the Kenwood filters, but would go with the INRAD filters instead, world of difference. I also wouldn't use a filter as narrow as that 1.8 one. I've found that cascading two 2.1 filters sounds much better to me, less distortion. That's a 'personal' thingy, so listen to that 1.8 before getting one.
    I also have found that I don't need a TCXO for the '480 ... yet. I wouldn't mind having that option, but haven't needed it so far.
    The one option I'd really like to have (don't sell them in the USA) is the doo-kicky for combining the radio and control head. Of course, if I really had to have one I'd just make the silly thing. Oh well.
    - 'Doc
     
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  10. WA8ZYT

    WA8ZYT North Florida

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    I have found my 480 to be quite stable. Thanks for the link, ordered the 1.8 Khz filter for mine, a little cheaper than AES, plus no sales tax!
     
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  11. Se7en

    Se7en Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for all the reply's.

    I have no idea how filters work...im just learning how to use the filtering on my ic-7000...o_O

    Sent from my DROIDX using Tapatalk 2
     
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  12. 928bolo

    928bolo W9WDX Amateur Radio Club Member

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    I wish Inrad filters fit the 480 but they don't.
     
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  13. unit248

    unit248 Active Member

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    I have the older Kenwood SO-2 TXCO option for my TS-850SAT and TS-950SDX. At least with the TS-850SAT, there was a noticeable improvement in frequency stability when I installed it. (The TS-950SDX comes with it built in and I've never tried disabling it, so I don't know how much difference it makes there.)

    The extra stability is useful for certain digital modes, where it's important that you not drift in order to maintain a lock on the signal you're receiving so that you can continue to demodulate it successfully. I also prefer it for SSB since even a small amount of drift will be noticed there -- of course you can still understand what the other guy is saying but it can be annoying.

    Sadly, Kenwood changed both the IF conversion scheme and the master oscillator frequencies in their newer radios so the new filters and TXCO won't work in the older rigs. And the older ones are scarce. :(

    -Bill
     
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  14. Mudfoot

    Mudfoot Supporting Member

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    Sure are scarce.

    I pick them up when I see them at the fests. I have a decent collection.
     
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  15. TonyV225

    TonyV225 Supporting Member

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    The TCXO are nice if your running a mobile, It helps with keeping the radio stable when there are climate / temperature changes. I have them and can tell you that most radios used as a base will not need them although some of the older rigs may have a tendency to drift a bit more ;)
     
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