1. In celebration of the launch of the new redesigned site, we just gave away a FREE antenna! Click Here to See Who Won!

RG-8X vs. RG-8U coax?

Discussion in 'CB and Export Equipment and Accessories' started by Steve H, Jan 7, 2011.

  1. Steve H

    Steve H Member

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2010
    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    0
    I hope that I got the letters and numbers correct. I am wondering about the performance AND weatherproof comparisons between mini-8 cable and stiff RG-8 cable. It's for a cb base station installation.

    I'm installing a base cb antenna on the roof of my house, and just need enough length to get it to my cb in the basement. The mini-8 cable just seems really weak and flimsy for this application, but I've also had RG-8 cable cut nearly in half by a simple windstorm (up against the side of a gutter). So any advice would be appreciated.


     
    #1
  2. mackmobile43

    mackmobile43 Jock Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2008
    Messages:
    6,715
    Likes Received:
    362
    rg-8x is 1/4'' and rg-8u is 1/2'', big difference.

    I use the rg-8u on my base and you can beat a mule to death with it and still talk dx so you must be thinking of rg58u which is nearly the same size as 8x with a lower power handling capability.

    Get some rg-8u or 213 and that'll last for many years.
     
    #2
  3. jazzsinger

    jazzsinger Bullshit Buster

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2008
    Messages:
    1,712
    Likes Received:
    261
    personally i'd avoid both like the plague, neither is proper US mil spec cable, i doubt rg8/x was ever mil spec and rg8/u was replaced by rg213/u years ago as the military standard (which means if its real mil-c-17 spec rg8/u its donkeys years past its shelf life), i'd also avoid any cable that says the word type after its designation, which is another clue to inferior quality.

    if it ain't good enough for uncle sam it ain't getting anywhere near any of my antennas. fuck that for a game of soldiers.
     
    #3
  4. Charlie Brown

    Charlie Brown certifiable

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2010
    Messages:
    339
    Likes Received:
    53
    .






    .
    DAMN U MAD LOL :mad:
     
    #4
  5. i didnt know y'all had a Uncle Sam in the UK .....????
     
    #5
  6. jazzsinger

    jazzsinger Bullshit Buster

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2008
    Messages:
    1,712
    Likes Received:
    261
    We don't, but doesn't mean i don't know where to find quality. Uk equivalent Uniradio URM cables are just as good as uncle sam's RG spec. But these days it pays to have a far wider outlook than within your own countries borders.

    the way i see it is simple, if it's good enough for the most advanced military regime in the world ( albeit their a tad gung ho and more of a danger to their allies than enemies, but we try not to hold it against them:LOL:) then its just about good enough for my ass to dx on. As the transmission line is possibly THE most important part of your station, it's not an area i choose to skimp on Booty.
     
    #6
  7. W5LZ

    W5LZ Crotchety Old Bastard

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2005
    Messages:
    6,834
    Likes Received:
    726
    Considering the use it'd be put to, RG-8 (or RG-213) should do just fine. Won't be the absolute most bestest thing in the world, but the differences are not going to be that noticeable (if at all) at HF. If it's installed correctly, it won't be beat to death by the weather. Barring any nicks or cuts in the outer insulation, and if the 'ends'/connectors are sealed, there just aren't many coax cables that will not be weather resistant (weather -proof- costs more but is available). There really is such a thing as being 'practical'. If you really, really want the absolute mostest bestest 'bullet proof' coax cable around get ready for a very large bill! Unrealistic expectations will haunt you.
    - 'Doc
     
    #7
  8. mackmobile43

    mackmobile43 Jock Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2008
    Messages:
    6,715
    Likes Received:
    362
    George I don't necessarily base all my decisions on things that are military spec.

    I base my choices on personal experience and research on the product in question and the rg-8 has been around for decades and used in base and mobile installations for as many years so that's where I base my suggestions to Steve H. on.

    Yes I use rg-8 on my lw-150 vertical that is a 41' run from the antenna to the radio and in that length the is no appreciable losses and I use a better version of mini-8 which has a foil shield over the braided shield to my g5rv and both serve me well and actually exceed my needs.

    Steve H. stated that his antenna on the roof so there is no need for a special coax that is rated for underground use so his run will be short enough for the rg-8 to be efficient in power loss saving him some money to be used for other stuff like a good swr/power meter or maybe a better radio or antenna and he can update his feed line later if need .
     
    #8
  9. AudioShockwav

    AudioShockwav Extraterrestrial Admin Staff Member

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2005
    Messages:
    5,244
    Likes Received:
    917
    Too add to Jazz N Doc`s post
    Another thing to think about, old coax....is old coax.
    Coax , at least in my opinion, over the years has a life span.
    Yes being installed correctly helps a bunch, but if you live in an area with brutal weather conditions, it is tough on coax just being there.
    Depending on the operating conditions, it can become weathered, connectors work loose from the rotor flexing it, the shield oxidizes and so on.
    It pays to examine it from time to time depending on where you live, weather conditions it has to endure, etc.
    Sealing connectors is very important, even more so with certain type`s of coax.
    Yes I agree....feed line is a very important part of your station.

    73
    Jeff
     
    #9
  10. Steve H

    Steve H Member

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2010
    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    0
    I appreciate all the answers, everyone. I found a place that sells both RG-8 and 213 cable on the internet. They are the same price for an 18 ft. piece with the connectors already soldered on. So when Uncle Sam (the American one) sends me my tax return, I'll get to work on this.;)
     
    #10
  11. 74IN

    74IN Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2003
    Messages:
    1,831
    Likes Received:
    52
    Since this is in the CB section, I'll dare going against the grain on this.

    The loss difference is negligible on 27 Mhz. I use 8X on it with no problems. I have used 8U (mine is 1/2") and Times LMR 400 and cannot tell any difference. I think the loss tables back me up on this at 27Mhz.

    I now use the 400 for VHF/UHF (where line loss is a significant factor) and the 8U for whatever I need it for.

    In this application, 8X seems fine unless high power is used.
     
    #11
  12. 74IN

    74IN Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2003
    Messages:
    1,831
    Likes Received:
    52
    I looked up 8U and it's a bit larger than a centimeter ( 10.29 mm) with the foam dielectric being larger than 1/4" (.285"). The mini is the small stuff.
     
    #12
  13. if money is tight and your doing half a kilowatt or less PEP id feel fine with QUALITY 8x on a 100 ft or less run . if youre running high power , a longer run or money isnt a problem id get some davis bury-flex and quality amphenol connectors . make sure both the center and braid/shield conductors are securely soldered to the 259s .
     
    #13
  14. Steve H

    Steve H Member

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2010
    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    0
    RG-8U cable is just over .4 inches in diameter, according to a couple of sites that are selling it. That's close to a half inch.

    I won't be pushing more than about 20 watts through it. But the cable breaking down at over 100 watts? I'll admit that I'm not an expert here, but that seems a little off. Please correct me if I'm wrong.
     
    #14
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2011
  15. 74IN

    74IN Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2003
    Messages:
    1,831
    Likes Received:
    52
    UV exposure from the sun degrades the plastic coating by drying it and that's when things go south.

    I guess "a very long time" can be construed differently in different environmental exposures.
     
    #15

Share This Page