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11 meter mod for icom 706mk2g

MisterFatty

Poppin Fresh!
Aug 1, 2008
698
34
38
Why don't you self appointed stuffed shirts Cruise Ebay some more, I'm sure there are some Radios and Amps that need your attention...
 

gc505

Member
Sep 22, 2008
48
0
16
Considering I am on 80 meters quite often and hear the most foul language, sickos talking trash. Behavior that is only rivaled by the worst CB'er I find your critique rather suspect.
Well said. 80m is overflowing with self-righteous, glorified CB'ers who ooze filth. 20 and 40 are often just as raunchy.

I'm a General Class and I spend about 50% of my radio time on 80/75 and the other 50% on 11m. Often I find there is very little difference between the participants on 80 and 11m.

I've found the biggest difference between ham ops and CB'ers is the arrogance level of the license holders.
 

hookedon6

W9WDX Amateur Radio Club Member
Jun 21, 2008
1,484
243
73
... I have a group here who bounce from 28.365 USB to 27.365 LSB all day long with the same radios...
the imbeciles on 27.365/28.365...are not Hams, they are scum hypocrites...

are you refering to the group that is centered in the PA area? if so, their "clock is ticking" so to speak;)
 

scantheband

Member
May 17, 2007
62
0
16
USA
Why waste your 706 on 11 meters?

Hmmm... I hate to feed the troll, but... a "waste?"

I don't think so. A 706 makes a dandy 11 meter/CB/freeband rig! You can hear mine anywhere from 25 to 28 MHz.

My 706 works great on the ham bands, too. It's not the best CW rig, though. For CW I prefer my Ten-Tec gear.
 

KingCobra_CDX882

W9WDX Amateur Radio Club Member
Mar 30, 2005
2,035
48
58
Opening up the 706 MKIIG for 11 meters is fine
For those doing so "without a ticket"...So What..

Many use it as a stepping stone to Obtaining their Ticket.
(such as i did and then had 3 of my friends do Exactly the same)

The MKIIG works Great on SSB on 11 meters and fine throughout HF/VHF/UHF on SSB and FM

OK so what on am is 40 watts on SSB is 100 watts (on 11 meters)
That is Nothing compared to the countless amps/linears used Illegally on 11 meters with 1000's of watts

At least the MKIIG is a AB1 Biased radio and as such is at least clean (compared to most amps being far less clean)
 
Jan 19, 2009
21
3
11
Yes the Icom 706 MKIIG is easily modified and does a great job even on AM
40 watt carrier will modulate upto 100 watts where am carriers around 4-18 watts modulate downward ....7 on mic gain setting
Its just as illegal as speeding at 26 mph in a 25 mph school zone just a higher $$$ figure fine should you be caught using it on 11 meters. I will say they do sound good when you hear one on cb ssb and crystal clear on AM with mic setting around 7 with 40 watts carrier into a dummy load H setting .Yes they do a great job but myself I did the Transmit mod only to get 60 meter coverage .



http://www.athensarc.org/706.asp This page is only for the 706 MKIIG Version the earlier models are different on the mods
Its about 1/2 way down his website page picture is included .
 
Last edited:

S244

Member
Nov 7, 2009
3
0
11
IC 706 and IC-706MKII question

A friend of mine another trucker said he has one in each of his trucks and has had them in for about ten years .He is not one of the AS_ _ _ _ _ _ he talks on SSB but most of the time on 17 or 19 and stays on 9 when he is at home. I asked him what mic he has and he said he bought a mic adapter off E-BAY so he can run any 4 pin mic and does use a DM 452 Echo/Talk back, I do have to say it is a clean sound set of radios he has. Has anyone out there tried to add TALK BACK and use a ECHO MIC on one of these?
:unsure: :bdh:
 

packrat

Active Member
Sep 24, 2008
749
19
28
S.W. Florida
A friend of mine another trucker said he has one in each of his trucks and has had them in for about ten years .He is not one of the AS_ _ _ _ _ _ he talks on SSB but most of the time on 17 or 19 and stays on 9 when he is at home. I asked him what mic he has and he said he bought a mic adapter off E-BAY so he can run any 4 pin mic and does use a DM 452 Echo/Talk back, I do have to say it is a clean sound set of radios he has. Has anyone out there tried to add TALK BACK and use a ECHO MIC on one of these?
:unsure: :bdh:

Um, isnt channel 9 reserved for emergency use only???
 

AudioShockwav

Extraterrestrial
Staff member
Apr 6, 2005
7,487
5,198
593
Sierras Near Yosemite National Park
I would only tell the person to use that rig with human decency and professionalism. And I would invite him to get his ticket so we can have some real people again on the Amateur bands and not the stuffy old men who think their fecal matter smells like fresh cut roses.
Ahhh, a breath of fresh air.

Um, isn't channel 9 reserved for emergency use only???

Not so much anymore, I have not heard a REACT member on CH 9 in over ten years in the general area around here in CA.
They used to be quite active, but not anymore, although In the past I have heard and helped with distress call`s on that channel.
Interesting the Sheriff`s dept down in the valley where I work still has a 1/4 "droopy drawers " mounted and And I just called a friend that works there and he told me that they do have a 40 channel Washington Base radio there, but he has never seen it turned on.
I seem to remember not to long ago on the FCC web site I had read that channel 9 is used only for emergency communications or for traveler assistance but the use of all channels is on a shared basis.
Dam if I can find it now.

Here is some more past history about channel usage, but it is somewhat dated now.....


History

In the 1960s, the service was popular for small trade businesses (e.g., electricians, plumbers, carpenters) and transportation services (e.g., taxi and trucking firms). "10 codes" originally used in the public service (e.g., police, fire, ambulance) and land mobile service were used for short acknowledgments. With the advancement of solid state technology (transistors replacing tubes) in the 1970s, the weight, size, and cost of the radios decreased. US truckers were at the head of the boom. Many CB clubs were formed, and a special CB slang language evolved. The prominent use of CB radios in mid- and late-1970s films (see list below), television shows such as The Dukes of Hazzard (debuted 1979), and in popular novelty songs such as C.W. McCall's "Convoy" (1976) helped to establish the radios as a nationwide craze in America from the mid-1970s to the early 1980s.

Originally, CB did require a license and the use of a call sign, but when the CB craze was at its peak, many people ignored this requirement and used made up nicknames or "handles". The use of handles instead of call signs is related to the common practice of using the radios to warn other drivers of speed traps during the time when the United States dropped the national speed limit to 55 mph (90 km/h) beginning in 1974 in response to the 1973 hike in oil prices. The FCC recommended the use of ten-codes and these were used, often in a shortened form, but also many slang terms were developed.

The low cost and simple operation of CB equipment gave access to a communications medium that was previously only available to specialists. The "boom" in CB usage in the 1970s and in Britain in the early 1980s bears several similarities to the advent of the Internet in the 1990s. The many restrictions on the authorized use of CB radio led to widespread disregard of the regulations, most notably in antenna height, distance restriction for communications, licensing and the use of call signs, and allowable transmitter power. Eventually, the license requirement was dropped entirely.

Originally, there were only 23 CB channels in the U.S.; 40-channel radios did not come along until 1977. In the 1960s, channels 1-8 and 15-22 were reserved for "intrastation" communications among units under the same license, while the other channels (9-14 and 23) could be used for "inter station" calls to other licenses.

In the early 1970s, channel 9 became reserved for emergency use. Channel 10 was used for highway communications, and channel 11 was used as a general calling channel. Later, channel 19 became the preferred highway channel in most areas as it did not have the adjacent-channel interference problems with channel 9.

Until the late 1970s when synthesized radios appeared, CB radios were controlled by plug-in quartz crystals. Almost all were AM only, though there were a few single sideband sets in the early days.

In 1973, various groups petitioned the FCC for an allocation of frequencies near 220 MHz for a new "Class E" Citizen's Band service. This was opposed by amateur radio organizations as well as other government agencies and commercial users who desired this allocation for their own usage. While the "Class E" initiative was not successful early on, the Reagan Administration sponsored some of these requirements for the development of the Family Radio Service, General Mobile Radio Service and Multi-Use Radio Service. These services fulfilled a majority of the requirements (e.g., eliminate some of the interference and skip that existed on the shortwave frequencies) proposed by the petitioners in 1973. Today, these radios are quiet, affordable, and readily accessible.

Throughout the 1970s and early 1980s, a phenomenon was developing over the CB radio. Similar to the Internet chat rooms a quarter century later, the CB allowed people to get to know one another in a quasi-anonymous manner. Many movies and stories about CBers and the culture on-the-air developed.

In Britain, some people were using CB radio illegally in the 1970s, a craze which suddenly peaked in 1980, leading to legalization on 2 November 1981. However, in the summer of 1981 the British government was still saying that CB would never be legalized on 27 MHz. The government wanted a uhf frequency around 860 MHz named 'Open Channel' instead. Eventually 40 channels at 27 MHz, plus 20 channels on 934 MHz were legalized. Both allocations used frequencies unique to the UK; the 934 MHz allocation was later withdrawn in 1998. CB's inventor Al Gross made the first legal British CB call from Trafalgar Square, London.
73
Jeff
 

Radiopunk0

New Member
Jul 31, 2022
1
1
1
66
being a scofflaw..

I find this humorous I guess you are making a funny right?

Considering I am on 80 meters quite often and hear the most foul language, sickos talking trash. Behavior that is only rivaled by the worst CB'er I find your critique rather suspect.

Considering that many CB'ers are actually Amateurs working Amateur equipment on CB I find this post funny. I have a group here who bounce from 28.365 USB to 27.365 LSB all day long with the same radios. So are they being a scofflaw? I would say yes since they are all ticket holders.

I hear people on 20 meters acting like fools as well.

I hold a ticket and I have made it practice to not tell anyone unless I am on the air and need to use it. I don't care for hypocrites and many many amateurs are just that. Well most...

I would only tell the person to use that rig with human decency and professionalism. And I would invite him to get his ticket so we can have some real people again on the Amateur bands and not the stuffy old men who think their fecal matter smells like fresh cut roses.

Why don't I use my Extra class call here? Because of people like you, who would try and black ball me because I disagree. Yes it's been tried before.

I do not let the imbeciles on 27.365/28.365 know I am an extra as well, as these idiots are not Hams, they are scum hypocrites. They talk down to CB'ers and act worse than any CB'er I have heard to date. So who are the scofflaws?


I started in CB in 1968
This was the best post i have read in a long time. Im an extra class ticket holder myself. Even was a radioman in the Navy. So i have done more crap with communications than most wannabe amateurs lol. But i still hang on 11 meters cause thats where i began. And in a shtf, those bands and advanced capabilities of radios will be needed along with ham bands
 
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