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Texas Star amplifier.

Oatmeal

Active Member
Mar 22, 2009
484
78
38
West Virginia..
Any of you guys buy a TS 500 from hy electronics, and have them to convert it to use on 11m band?

I talked to those guys a few days ago about doing this, I also ask about retuning it after this is done so the swr would be ok when I received it and they told me they did do this just wondering if they really do or not..

This is why asking if anyone has bought a amp from them?
 

All they do is convert it, there is nothing really to "tune" in a Texas Star amplifier. They either work or they don't. When you buy a hand built amplifier like X-Force, TnT, Davemade and so on yea, they do a much better job of matching up to a 50 ohm load.
 
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I will never understand why Texas Star amps are so popular other than the fact there are no mass produced amps for 11 meters worth a damn anymore.
Why buy a Texas Star 500 for $380 when you can buy a TNT T600HD for $400 and have much better performance?
 
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. When you buy a hand built amplifier like X-Force, TnT, Davemade and so on yea, they do a much better job of matching up to a 50 ohm load.

Why does a Davemade match up better to a 50 ohm load than a Texas star? Is because "they" say so?

I would like to hear your expert analysis why this is so.
 
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Why does a Davemade match up better to a 50 ohm load than a Texas star? ....
Texas Star amps generally don't seem to present a 50 ohm load to the transmitter, the tricks needed to get an impedance match and make them work are the root source of many of the magic jumper length myths floating around in the CB community. Back in the day guys I knew who ran Texas Stars always had a variety of different length jumpers available so they could find the one that would make things work by trial and error (not 100% sure but I believe what they where trying to achieve is called a "conjugate match", please correct me if I have the terminology wrong).
 
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Still no explanation why...
The inputs on the Texas Stars just aren't matched to a 50 ohm source very well, this has been common knowledge for at least the 25~30 years that I've been involved with radio. To the best of my knowledge a proper fix would involve rewinding the transformer on the input side.

Not an expert analysis, just what I've observed over the years. Take it for what it's worth.
 
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Common knowledge can be the same as urban legends, if one tells a lie long enough, it becomes fact.

So why does my Texas star measure perfectly into a 50 ohm dummy load?
 
Common knowledge can be the same as urban legends, if one tells a lie long enough, it becomes fact.

So why does my Texas star measure perfectly into a 50 ohm dummy load?

Problem with the Texas Star amps has always been on the input side, in other words it shows up between the radio and amp.

I've seen it myself more than enough times over the years to know it's not an urban legend, but unfortunately I don't know of a way to put my personal experience/observations on the internet in a way that it can't be dismissed as lies by those who wish to do so.

I think I'll just step aside and leave this thread alone now.
 
Common knowledge can be the same as urban legends, if one tells a lie long enough, it becomes fact.

So why does my Texas star measure perfectly into a 50 ohm dummy load?

Sounds like you got a good one. I have owned around a dozen texas stars and palomars, they are hit or miss on being right at 50 ohms. At one time i had 2 dx350 models, one was 1.7 swr and the other 1.2 with nothing changed but the amplifier.

Hand built amplifiers get some more precise hand tuneing so they are dead on the 50ohms. Joker and Messenger amplifiers even have tuneing VR pots for just such adjustments.

This is why some palomar amplifiers don't unkey sometimes with a short jumper. Run a 6 or 9 foot jumper and they work fine. It's just the way 11m unregulated amplifiers are built, they are what they are. Some custom amp builders take the time to make a quality amplifier so that is why they are better then a mass produced illegal "factory" amplifier.

Hope several of these replys help.
 
Still no analytical accounting for the claim.

IT is the 50 ohm impedance on the output that matters and that's what the one I have tests.
 
Still no analytical accounting for the claim.

IT is the 50 ohm impedance on the output that matters and that's what the one I have tests.

Can you elaborate on how you are testing output impedance of your Texas Star? The question you asked in post 4 was answered in post 5. Please keep your Texas Star CB junk off the amateur bands. You could sell it to a trucker and put the money towards something nice.
 

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