1. You can now help support WorldwideDX when you shop on Amazon at no additional cost to you! Simply follow this Shop on Amazon link first and a portion of any purchase is sent to WorldwideDX to help with site costs.
    Dismiss Notice

tilting a yagi?

Discussion in 'Amateur Radio Antennas' started by spitzer, May 11, 2011.

  1. Happy_Hamer

    Happy_Hamer Administrator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2001
    Messages:
    5,046
    Likes Received:
    141
    I hate to sound like the "put it up and talk crowd" ,,,,,,,



    I had a friend that was new into radio but was old into being stubborn.

    He lived on 30 acres and was able to get 6 different wire antennas up very high.

    He could have put up a yagi on a tower, he said there was no need because he had wires in different orientation that did just as good as a yagi :headbang

    I owned a SuperAntenna YP-3, sold to Moleculo.

    The friend bought a galvanized 40 foot push up pole one day to mount an imax 2000 above the trees.

    We decided to temporarily mount the YP-3 on the push up for comparison to the wires.

    The yagi was pointed north on 20 meter SSB and his collection of wires is on an antenna switch so switching to different antennas was no problem.

    On the YP-3 we were talking to Russia consistently all night with 100 watts.

    Not one of his wire antennas could even hear the Russian station!!!!!

    Simply putting a yagi up following install directions will get you more of the world on your logbook. Don't worry about the few degree of tilt.

    By the way, my friend later bought a tri band Mosely and installed it on a 60 foot tower.

    Have fun
     

  2. HiDef

    HiDef Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2008
    Messages:
    543
    Likes Received:
    6
    Was your friend feeding the wire antennas with coax?

     
  3. Happy_Hamer

    Happy_Hamer Administrator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2001
    Messages:
    5,046
    Likes Received:
    141
    Only the G5RV was fed with coax, the others were 450 ohm ladder line


     
  4. Happy_Hamer

    Happy_Hamer Administrator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2001
    Messages:
    5,046
    Likes Received:
    141
    ooops and the 160 meter loop was fed with coax
     
  5. Captain Kilowatt

    Captain Kilowatt Professional Amateur
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2005
    Messages:
    15,787
    Likes Received:
    8,178
    You need a lot of wire to perform as good as even a modest yagi. I had a 600+ foot longwire many years ago and it was aimed pretty much towards the north-northwest at Japan. On 20m it worked great with a theoretical gain of about 7-8 dBi which is pretty much the same as a Cushcraft A3 tribander. It was of course mounted much lower so it would never perform quite as good but believe me it did work good on 20m into Japan. I would never want a bunch of wires instead of a good yagi but with enough real estate you can get a BIG signal from a wire antenna however they are a bitch to rotate. :D
     
  6. wavrider

    wavrider W9WDX Amateur Radio Club Member

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2009
    Messages:
    3,309
    Likes Received:
    1,115
    I had an all band 160 meter doublet fed with ladder line.

    It was at 65' top feed point.

    On 20 meters it would outperform my tribander installed above the doublet but only in the direction of the wire. SE-NW, it would scream into the Islands and into NW of the continent, sucked going into EU or S Africa.

    Wires will work, as CK mentioned but the amount of real estate and predicting which way the lobes will shoot of the wire can be alot of fun, or headache depending on how you look at it.

    It all comes down to how you want to operate, what are your expectations, and what you want to achieve.

    Yagi at height hands down best imo, Vertical at height less expensive and they do work, not as well as a yagi though.

    Wires are fun to play with on upper HF freq, phased arrays, curtains, bobtails etc.etc.

    Usually the DX station will have a big yagi, monobander or quad and that antenna does most of the work, especially when the wire is used for transmitting.

    So whatever works out best and fits the budget, but most of all, just have fun and enjoy the hobby while trying to make the contacts.
     
  7. Kamikaze

    Kamikaze Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2010
    Messages:
    318
    Likes Received:
    7
    +1

    A 160 doublet @ 65' fed with good balanced feedline and a decent coupler will
    smoke a 3 el. tribander in 2 directions.

    Most put wire antenna up and hope for the best without knowing where the lobes will work.

    Someone claiming wire antenna cannot keep up with a tribander must be missing something.

    Maybe they use a 4:1 balun into a low impedance load.

    Maybe they use unmatched coax after a tuner to a balun.

    Maybe they are mistaken about the actual orientation of the wire for the target zone.

    Hard to tell what's not right but wire antennas cut to work on 75 or 160 fed properly can be excellent performers on the higher bands.

    Nothing beats a good monobander built properly but not everyone has the room or money.
     
    #22 Kamikaze, May 18, 2011
    Last edited: May 18, 2011

Share This Page

  • About Us

    The WorldwideDX Radio Forum was originally established in 2001. We pride ourselves on welcoming Radio Hobby enthusiasts of all types, while offering unbiased, informative, and friendly discussion among the members. We are working every day to make sure our community is the best Radio Hobbyist's site.
  • Like us on Facebook

  • Premium VIP Member

    The management works very hard to make sure the community is running the best software, best designs, and all the other bells and whistles. Care to buy us a beer? We'd really appreciate it!

    Donate to us!