1. You can now help support WorldwideDX when you shop on Amazon at no additional cost to you! Simply follow this Shop on Amazon link first and a portion of any purchase is sent to WorldwideDX to help with site costs.
    Dismiss Notice

Courier Spartan SSB

Discussion in 'CB Radio Modifications' started by Bl4ckC4t, Jul 18, 2018.

  1. Bl4ckC4t

    Bl4ckC4t New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2018
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    I am relatively new to the CB thing, but have recently gotten my hands on an old Spartan. Quite a bit of bleed over and seems like the squelch knob is backwards (lower static to the left) I am curious if anyone knows how to tune these up to make them work amazing or if I should leave it alone.

    (I get good radio checks when I'm up to 1/2 mile on a trucks 6)



    I do hear a lot of skip around me, but cant reach out and respond and I can't seem to dial in well enough on ssb.
     

  2. nomadradio

    nomadradio Analog Retentive

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2005
    Messages:
    1,949
    Likes Received:
    1,379
    The antenna is a make-or-break item in a base station.

    You can hear a lot of stuff with a poor and inefficient antenna. But the transmit range will stink.

    Height is might. The higher it is, the more effective it will be.

    General rule, the larger the antenna the more effective it tends to be. You could make a simple "weeping willow" ground plane from four 9-foot long pieces of wire and a bracket with a coax socket on it. Just need a support to hang the top of the vertical element and a way to stretch the three 'ground plane' wires out at 45 degrees. Manufactured vertical antennas that are 18, 21 feet or longer tend to be more efficient than the home-made weeping willow, or one made commercially from metal rods.

    The quality of the coax connections is a big deal. The standard "PL-259" connector was designed for use inside an aircraft, away from the weather. To use it outdoors, you must weather seal it. You only have to get that plug wet on the outside surface for capillary forces to suck that moisture inside the plug, and possibly down the tiny gap between the outer jacket and the strands of the shield braid. If you see a mysterious puddle on the desk surface under the end of the antenna coax, you have filled that gap inside the coax with rain water.

    The shield should be soldered to the plug body for any plug used outdoors, and sealed from any intrusion of moisture.

    The radio is around 45 years old. If it were a 1973 car, you would know that any original belts, tires, hoses, seals, gaskets or bushings to be bad from age alone, even if the odometer says 750 miles.

    It is possible that the radio's channel crystals have drifted so far off frequency that your clarifier control can't tune in anyone who is ON the channel frequency.

    Maybe.

    If you hopped behind the wheel of a 1973 GTO you would doubtless find the need for a tuneup at the very least if it hasn't had one for decades.

    Might be the situation with this radio.

    73
     
    midnight special likes this.
  3. Bl4ckC4t

    Bl4ckC4t New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2018
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thank you! Will look into it all. Any way to fix Crystal's if they are off? Or do you know how to tune it up?
     
  4. nomadradio

    nomadradio Analog Retentive

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2005
    Messages:
    1,949
    Likes Received:
    1,379
    A quartz crystal is a sealed unit. No good way to correct one that has drifted too far from its original frequency.

    The alignment procedure will be kinda lengthy. Takes some equipment to get it aligned properly. I would not choose that model radio to learn that sort of procedure.

    I would start with an inline wattmeter, to put between the radio and the antenna. The meter should have a way to read the antenna's SWR. Best SWR reading is the lowest one. If your antenna or your coax feedline is not behaving properly, that reading will be high.

    Just finding out if the radio has normal transmit power would be worth knowing. If the transmitter is weak, that will reduce your range in a big way, too.

    Any attempt to make internal adjustments begins with the service data. That radio was made in two versions. The original "SSB" version and the "SSB-plus" model.

    Pretty sure they are different on the inside.

    73
     

Share This Page

  • About Us

    The WorldwideDX Radio Forum was originally established in 2001. We pride ourselves on welcoming Radio Hobby enthusiasts of all types, while offering unbiased, informative, and friendly discussion among the members. We are working every day to make sure our community is the best Radio Hobbyist's site.
  • Like us on Facebook

  • Premium VIP Member

    The management works very hard to make sure the community is running the best software, best designs, and all the other bells and whistles. Care to buy us a beer? We'd really appreciate it!

    Donate to us!