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FCC should just open up 11meters as a Citizens experimental band.

old goat 321

Well-Known Member
Dec 31, 2015
230
263
73
61
11 meters is a far better band so why would you want that?

SIX-SHOOTER
At the time, i was thinking about 11 meter being crowded. But on second thought, it only seems crowded when the skip is in. Lots of people running big power also. But most times its quiet. Not many locals at all. Thanks for calling me out. I rescind my original statement .
 

Captain Kilowatt

Professional Amateur
Staff member
Apr 6, 2005
16,833
10,962
823
58
Nova Scotia,Canada
11 meters is open far more where I live than 10 meters and has for the 25 years I have been in Amateur Radio.

SIX-SHOOTER

10m is open a lot more then people think since most are listening and not transmitting. I have been surprised countless times by listening to the bottom of the band for CW signals and then calling on a "dead" band only to have a DX station reply to my call. Same thing for 6m. I find that once a small bit of activity starts on the band it almost snowballs as other stations join in. Been like that pretty much for all of the 30 years I have been into amateur radio. :D
 

SIX-SHOOTER

Sr. Member
Oct 2, 2010
995
1,290
153
Macclenny,Fla.
10m is open a lot more then people think since most are listening and not transmitting. I have been surprised countless times by listening to the bottom of the band for CW signals and then calling on a "dead" band only to have a DX station reply to my call. Same thing for 6m. I find that once a small bit of activity starts on the band it almost snowballs as other stations join in. Been like that pretty much for all of the 30 years I have been into amateur radio. :D

With the nature of the bands it is a fact that 27 MHz is more likely to have propagation than 28/29 MHz. If you look at the MUF it’s pretty obvious that 11 meters is a far better band.I have been using 11 meters since 1965 and the other HF Bands for just over 25 years and the old timers on Amateur Radio have always told me that the FCC gave away the far better band since they were around when both were still Amateur Bands.I have never heard any of those old timers say that 10 meters was the better band.I have never thought it was even close.

SIX-SHOOTER
 

Captain Kilowatt

Professional Amateur
Staff member
Apr 6, 2005
16,833
10,962
823
58
Nova Scotia,Canada
With the nature of the bands it is a fact that 27 MHz is more likely to have propagation than 28/29 MHz. If you look at the MUF it’s pretty obvious that 11 meters is a far better band.I have been using 11 meters since 1965 and the other HF Bands for just over 25 years and the old timers on Amateur Radio have always told me that the FCC gave away the far better band since they were around when both were still Amateur Bands.I have never heard any of those old timers say that 10 meters was the better band.I have never thought it was even close.

SIX-SHOOTER

No disputing that 11m is open more then 10m. All I was saying is that 10m is open more than people think. I guess I was expecting more of an argument when you said it was a FAR better band. IMHO simply being open a bit more often does not make it FAR better but rather marginally better for band openings but number of band openings itself , again IMHO, does not make it FAR better as there are many other things to consider such as band crowding.
 

nomadradio

Analog Retentive
Apr 3, 2005
5,207
7,392
573
Louisville, KY
www.nomadradio.com
Back in the late 60s the Swan company built a transceiver that was meant to be used on the 10-meter ham band. Problem with 10 meters was that when the band opened, nobody knew to call CQ. CB, a megahertz below, had lots of local traffic whether the band was open or not. Swan marketed the model "1011" with a receive-only band for CB. The idea was to listen for skip on the CB side, then move up to 10 meters and call CQ when you heard distant 27 MHz stations.

Big mistake. Swan underestimated the widespread resentment of hams, still pi$$ed about losing what had been "their" 11-meter band in 1959. The Swan 1011 sold like a turd in the punchbowl at a wedding.

Swan dropped it.

A savvy entrepreneur named Sam I. Lewis saw how easy it was to disable the lockout that made the radio receive-only on 11 meters and hired Swan to make this radio with his brand name printed on it. Wasn't hard to predict how well a 100-Watt radio that had 27 MHz in it would sell. His initials "SIL" became the name "Siltronix". More Siltronix products made by Swan followed, as well as the more-familiar "Palomar" stuff made in a different facility in Escondido.

Since those days, the use of unattended beacon transmitters has been made legal on 10 meters. Nowadays you need only listen for a distant beacon to know when conditions may be favorable to call CQ on ten meters.

73
 

SIX-SHOOTER

Sr. Member
Oct 2, 2010
995
1,290
153
Macclenny,Fla.
No disputing that 11m is open more then 10m. All I was saying is that 10m is open more than people think. I guess I was expecting more of an argument when you said it was a FAR better band. IMHO simply being open a bit more often does not make it FAR better but rather marginally better for band openings but number of band openings itself , again IMHO, does not make it FAR better as there are many other things to consider such as band crowding.

11 meters will be open sometimes for weeks when there is not a single signal on 10 meters so that makes it far better to me.I prefer Amateur Radio to CB RADIO since so many children have taken over 11 meters and every day on any channel the children are doing what children do.

SIX-SHOOTER
 

Captain Kilowatt

Professional Amateur
Staff member
Apr 6, 2005
16,833
10,962
823
58
Nova Scotia,Canada
I prefer Amateur Radio to CB RADIO since so many children have taken over 11 meters and every day on any channel the children are doing what children do.

SIX-SHOOTER

That right there is one reason why I questioned your reasoning for saying 11m was FAR better than 10m. It is also the main reason why I disputed that. Band openings are not the only thing that may or may not make a band better.
 
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Captain Kilowatt

Professional Amateur
Staff member
Apr 6, 2005
16,833
10,962
823
58
Nova Scotia,Canada
Now lets talk about 12 meters.......
There is a awesome band that is really neglected.
Lol.
Ten is an incredible band when you look at how much frequency spectrum there is to play with.
It is huge!
We need to use it as much as we can.

73
Jeff

I like 10m. What other HF band can you run conventional modes like CW or SSB in addition to FM and work thru repeaters and even satellites?
 

2315 Robert

Grateful
May 28, 2016
276
150
53
50
Central Coast CA
Back in the late 60s the Swan company built a transceiver that was meant to be used on the 10-meter ham band. Problem with 10 meters was that when the band opened, nobody knew to call CQ. CB, a megahertz below, had lots of local traffic whether the band was open or not. Swan marketed the model "1011" with a receive-only band for CB. The idea was to listen for skip on the CB side, then move up to 10 meters and call CQ when you heard distant 27 MHz stations.

Big mistake. Swan underestimated the widespread resentment of hams, still pi$$ed about losing what had been "their" 11-meter band in 1959. The Swan 1011 sold like a turd in the punchbowl at a wedding.

Swan dropped it.

A savvy entrepreneur named Sam I. Lewis saw how easy it was to disable the lockout that made the radio receive-only on 11 meters and hired Swan to make this radio with his brand name printed on it. Wasn't hard to predict how well a 100-Watt radio that had 27 MHz in it would sell. His initials "SIL" became the name "Siltronix". More Siltronix products made by Swan followed, as well as the more-familiar "Palomar" stuff made in a different facility in Escondido.

Since those days, the use of unattended beacon transmitters has been made legal on 10 meters. Nowadays you need only listen for a distant beacon to know when conditions may be favorable to call CQ on ten meters.

73
Sam In Virginia?
 
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